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This is a changing photo exhibit.
Return again soon to see new images of Petra, and don't miss the Faces of Petra photo gallery.
The weli (small mosque) that currently tops Jebel Haroun is dated by an inscription above its door which states that the building was erected by Mohammed, son of Calaon, Sultan of Egypt, at his father's command, in the year 739 of the Islamic calendar (mid-13th century CE), and that it was restored in year 900 (1495 CE). This modern structure rests atop the ruins of an earlier church, probably dated to the Crusader period.

The mosque is cared for by a member of the Bedoul tribe named Mohammed (father of Suleiman Mohammed, one of the workers on the Great Temple and Lower Market excavations). Mohammed guards the site and protects it from vandals. He uses a large old skeleton key (seen above, hanging from the keyhole) to open the wooden door for pilgrims and tourists who want to visit the shrine. Inside is a sarcophagus honored as the symbolic tomb of Aaron and an underground chamber with a small niche that is believed by some to be the original burial spot.
Favorite Images of Petra
"Jebel Haroun: The Mountain of Aaron"
At 1350 meters above sea level, Jebel Haroun is the highest peak in the Petra area. One can easily pick out Jebel Haroun from miles around topped by a whitewashed mosque that stands out against the rose-red landscape and aqua blue sky.
Unless otherwise indicated, all photos, illustrations and text on this site are Copyright © 1999,  Leigh-Ann Bedal.
  Last updated: February 2000
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From the summit, there is a magnificent view of the rugged landscape that forms the eastern border of the Great Rift Valley (Wadi Araba') and across the "Wilderness of Zin" to the Negev desert.

Jebel Haroun is believed by many to be the Biblical Mount Hor, the place where Moses' brother, Aaron, died and was buried during the Exodus out of Egypt (Haroun is the arabic form of Aaron).
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At Mount Hor, on the boundary of the land of Edom, the Lord said to Moses and Aaron, "...Take Aaron and his son Eleazer and bring them up on Mount Hor. Strip Aaron of his vestments and put them on his son Eleazer. There Aaron shall be gathered unto the dead." Moses did as the Lord had commanded. They ascended Mount Hor in the sight of the whole community... and Aaron died there on the summit of the mountain. (Numbers 20:23-28)
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As a holy place, Jebel Haroun is a common destination for pilgrims of the Jewish, Christian and Muslims faiths.
In 1998, Finnish archaeological team began to excavate in the ruins of a large structure visible on the large plateau just below the summit (right, at center). The Monastery of the Mount of Aaron dates to the Byzantine period (4th-7th centuries CE).
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Unless otherwise indicated, all photos, illustrations and text on this site are Copyright © 1999,  Leigh-Ann Bedal.
  Last updated: February 2000
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The weli (small mosque) that currently tops Jebel Haroun is dated by an inscription above its door which states that the building was erected by Mohammed, son of Calaon, Sultan of Egypt, at his father's command, in the year 739 of the Islamic calendar (mid-13th century CE), and that it was restored in year 900 (1495 CE). This modern structure rests atop the ruins of an earlier church, probably dated to the Crusader period.

The mosque is cared for by a member of the Bedoul tribe named Mohammed (father of Suleiman Mohammed, one of the workers on the Great Temple and Lower Market excavations). Mohammed guards the site and protects it from vandals. He uses a large old skeleton key (seen above, hanging from the keyhole) to open the wooden door for pilgrims and tourists who want to visit the shrine. Inside is a sarcophagus honored as the symbolic tomb of Aaron and an underground chamber with a small niche that is believed by some to be the original burial spot.
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Jebel Haroun is a favorite retreat for archaeologists working in Petra. After a full work day, a group combined of bedouin and archaeologists hike (or ride donkeys) to the top -- a three to four hour trip depending on one's hiking skills or the laziness of one's donkey. We arrive in time to enjoy the view and witness an incredible sunset that is appreciated by man and beast alike.
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Hussein Hamed and Fatima Dakhilallah on the ride up to Jebel Haroun
It is impossible for any visitor to Jebel Haroun not to experience the peace and tranquility of the setting and not to appreciate its sacredness to all those who come to pay homage to Aaron and their God.
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A camel enjoys the sunset from Jebel Haroun
Prayer in silhouette
This is a changing photo exhibit.
Return again soon to see new images of Petra, and don't miss the Faces of Petra photo gallery.